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F&ES 714 01 (23582) /ENAS646
Environmental Hydrology
James Saiers
TTh 11.35-12.50 KRN G01
Spring 2013 
 
3 credits. Exploration of the roles of natural processes and anthropogenic activities in regulating the quantity, distribution, and chemical composition of the Earth's freshwater. Students gain exposure to theoretical and applied elements of surface and subsurface hydrology. The theory covered in the course focuses on hydrologic phenomena of societal and environmental importance, including stream-flow generation, wetland-water cycling, groundwater-flow dynamics, contaminant migration in surface and groundwater, and water use and redistribution by plants. Application of theory is accomplished through student use of hydrologic simulation models, which are expressions of theory and essential tools of water-resource management and assessment. Intended as a first course in scientific hydrology; appropriate for M.E.M., M.E.Sc., and Ph.D. students, as well as for advanced undergraduates.
Because hydrology is a quantitative science, treatment of the course subject matter involves mathematics. F&ES 714b is designed for students who typically do not have previous course work in mathematics beyond one semester of college-level calculus. Students who have not completed a college-level calculus course can succeed in F&ES 714b provided that they are comfortable with arithmetic operations and algebra and are willing to learn a few, very basic principles of introductory calculus. Although students use hydrologic simulation models, the course does not involve any computer programming and requires no special computer skills.