Archaeological Studies

For courses in other departments that may count toward the major, see the printed YCPS or consult the director of undergraduate studies.
Information regarding the required and recommended textbooks for courses in Yale College can be found in the Online Course Information system (OCI).

 
ARCG  030b , Inca Culture and Society .
MW 1.00-2.15 AKW 100 Richard Burger
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
History of the Inca empire of the Central Andes, including the empire?s impact on the nations and cultures it conquered. Overview of Inca religion, economy, political organization, technology, and society. Ways in which different schools of research have approached and interpreted the Incas over the last century, including the influence of nationalism and other sources of bias on contemporary scholarship.
Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.
 
ARCG  100b , The Genesis and Collapse of Old World Civilizations .
TTh 11.35-12.50 LUCE 101 Harvey Weiss
Hu, So  (24)  
The archaeology of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley from early agriculture to class formation and the early cities and empires. How did these societies develop and why did they collapse? Earliest epics and contemporary ideologies, including the Bushes in Baghdad, examined in literature and film.
Readings in translation.
 
ARCG  172a , Great Hoaxes and Fantasies in Archaeology .
MW 11.35-12.50 LC 101 William Honeychurch
So  (34)  
Examination of selected archaeological hoaxes, cult theories, and fantasies; demonstration of how archaeology can be manipulated to authenticate nationalistic ideologies, religious causes, and modern stereotypes. Examples of hoaxes and fantasies include the lost continent of Atlantis, Piltdown man, ancient giants roaming the earth, and alien encounters. Evaluation of how, as a social science, archaeology is capable of rejecting such interpretations about the past.
 
ARCG  227b , Archaeology of Asian Civilizations .
MW 9.00-10.15 WLH 113 Anne Underhill
So  (0)  
A broad archaeological survey of Asia, drawing on diachronic case studies from several regions. Evidence from archaeological and ethnographic research illuminates sociopolitical organization, economic relationships, ideologies, and interregional interaction. Emphasis on how particular sequences of change contribute to the study of sociocultural themes in anthropological archaeology.
 
ARCG  230a , Stratigraphy .
TTh 9.00-10.15 KGL 226; Th 1.30-3.20 KGL 226 Leo Hickey
Sc  (22)  
The nature and classification of sedimentary rock bodies; principles in determining their ages by fossils and other means; interpretation of depositional environments; the historical record of the dynamic response of sediments to mountain building, to changes in sea level and climate, and to the evolution of Earth's biota. Laboratory sessions include one overnight weekend field trip and one Saturday field trip.
Prerequisite: CHEM 113b or higher or permission of instructor.
 
ARCG  232b , Ancient Civilizations of the Andes .
TTh 1.00-2.15 WLH 120 Richard Burger
So  (26)  
Survey of the archaeological cultures of Peru and Bolivia from the earliest settlement through the late Inca state.
 
ARCG  235b , The Worlds of Homer .
MW 2.30-3.45 LORIA B51 Karen Foster
Hu  (37)  
Interdisciplinary study of the artistic, literary, and cultural worlds of Homer?s Iliad and Odyssey, beginning in the Bronze Age of the Trojan War heroes and ending with the Homeric legacy in Western civilization. Topics include Homeric myth and reality, new archaeological evidence, the emergence of Greek art and thought, and Mediterranean and Near Eastern interconnections.
 
ARCG  238a , Buried Cities: Thera, Pompeii, and Herculaneum .
MW 2.30-3.45 LORIA B51 Karen Foster
Hu  (37)  
Study of three ancient cities buried by volcanic eruptions - Thera in c. 1530 B.C. and Pompeii and Herculaneum in A.D. 79 - with emphasis on their architecture, wall paintings, and small finds in cultural and historical context.
 
ARCG  243a , Greek Art and Architecture .
MW 11.35-12.50 LORIA 351 Milette Gaifman
Hu  (34)  
A survey of Greek architecture, sculpture, and painting from the late Geometric period (c. 760 B.C.) to Alexander the Great (c. 323 B.C.), with particular emphasis on social and historical context.
 
ARCG  252a , Roman Architecture .
TTh 9.00-10.15 LORIA 351 Diana Kleiner
Hu  (0)  
The great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Study of city planning and individual monuments and their decoration, including mural painting. Emphasis on developments in Rome, Pompeii, and central Italy; survey of architecture in the provinces.
 
ARCG  272b , African Prehistory .
MW 1.00-2.15 SA10 220 Roderick McIntosh
So  (0)  
Survey of the archaeological evidence for the original contributions of the African continent to the human condition. The unresolved issues of African prehistory, from the time of the first hominids, through the development of food production and metallurgy, to the rise of states and cities.
 
ARCG  277a , Archaeological Field Techniques .
MW 4.00-5.15 SA10 23 John Hale
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
An introduction to the practice and techniques of modern archaeology, including methods of excavation, recording, mapping, dating, and ecological analysis.
Must be taken concurrently with ANTH 278La.
 
ARCG  278La , Archaeology Laboratory I .
Sa 8.30-5.00 SA10 23 John Hale
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Instruction in the field at an archaeological site in Connecticut. Stratigraphy, mapping, artifact recovery, and excavation strategy.
Must be taken concurrently with ANTH 277a.
 
ARCG  279Lb , Archaeology Laboratory II .
W 2.30-5.30 SA10 23 Roderick McIntosh
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
A practical introduction to processing and analysis of excavated artifacts. Emphasis on familiarity with a range of methods and materials. Intensive study and written report on one group of artifacts.
 
ARCG  293a , Underwater Archaeology .
MW 9.00-10.15 LC 317 John Hale
So  (32)  
Overview of major underwater archaeological discoveries, from shipwrecks to sunken cities. Technology and methods used to find, survey, excavate, and interpret submerged sites.
 
ARCG  320a , Mesopotamian Origins .
Th 2.30-4.20 RKZ 06 Harvey Weiss
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Analysis of the archaeological and paleoenvironmental data for rain-fed and irrigation agriculture settlement, subsistence, and politicoeconomic innovation in Mesopotamia, from sedentary agriculture villages to cities and states to early empire. Focus on combinations of dynamic social and environmental forces that drove these developments.
Prerequisite: ANTH 150a or equivalent, or with permission of instructor.
 
ARCG  326b , Ancient Civilizations of the Eurasian Steppes .
W 2.30-4.20 LUCE 102 William Honeychurch
So  (37)  
Permission of instructor required
Examination of peoples of the steppe zone that stretches from Eastern Europe to Mongolia. Overview of what archaeologists know about Eurasian steppe societies, with emphasis on the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron, and medieval ages. Attention both to material culture and to historical sources. Topics range from the domestication of the horse to Genghis Khan's world empire, including the impact these events had on neighboring civilizations in Europe and Asia.
 
ARCG  362b , Observing Earth from Space .
TTh 9.00-10.15 ESC 110; ThF 1.30-3.20 ESC 119; ThF 3.30-5.20 ESC 119 Ronald Smith
Sc QR (0)  
Permission of instructor required
A practical introduction to satellite image analysis of Earth?s surface. Topics include the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, satellite-borne radiometers, data transmission and storage, computer image analysis, the merging of satellite imagery with GIS and applications to weather and climate, oceanography, surficial geology, ecology and epidemiology, forestry, agriculture, archaeology, and watershed management.
Prerequisites: college-level physics or chemistry, two courses in geology and natural science of the environment or equivalents, and computer literacy.
 
ARCG  363b , Archaeologies of Empire .
Th 2.30-4.20 SA10 307 Harvey Weiss
Hu, So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Comparative study of origins, structures, efficiencies, and limitations of imperialism, ancient and modern, in the Old and New Worlds, from Akkad to "Indochine" and from Wari to Aztec. The contrast between ancient and modern empires examined from the perspectives of nineteenth- and twentieth-century archaeology and political economy.
 
ARCG  374a , Origins of Andean Civilization .
T 1.30-3.20 CO493 108 Richard Burger
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Meets during reading period
The diversity of early Andean complex societies and their transformations during the first two millennia B.C. Special attention to the Chavin civilization of the northern Peruvian highlands, including its art, technology, socioeconomic organization, territorial expansion, and cultural antecedents. Emphasis on recent research and on explanatory models that have been used to explain the emergence of complexity in pre-Hispanic Peru.
 
ARCG  454a , Statistcs forArchaeol Analysis .
TTh 1.00-2.15 RKZ 06 William Honeychurch
   (26)  
 
ARCG  456a , Reconstructing Human Evolution: An Ecological Approach .
W 1.30-3.20 ESC 100 Andrew Hill
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Examination of methods for obtaining data relevant to ecological factors that have affected human evolutionary change, such as changes in climate, competition with other animals, and availability and kinds of food supply. Evaluation of techniques for obtaining ecological data in such fields as geology, paleobotany, and paleozoology. Ethnographic, primatological, and other biological models of early human behavior.
 
ARCG  466b , Archaeological Analysis of Ceramic Pottery .
T 1.30-3.20 SA10 24 William Honeychurch
So  (26)  
Techniques and theories used to relate the material remnants of pottery ceramics to social behavior and meanings. Examination of pottery technologies such as physical and chemical characteristics of clay and temper, and the technology of creating useful ceramic vessels from clay. Hands-on experience with ceramics analysis, including drawing pottery, analyzing fabric, working with quantitative ceramics data, creating typologies, and approaches to sourcing.
 
ARCG  471a , Directed Reading and Research in Archaeology .
1 HTBA William Honeychurch
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Qualified students may pursue special reading or research under the guidance of an instructor. A written statement of the proposed research must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies for approval.
 
ARCG  472b , Directed Reading and Research in Archaeology .
1 HTBA Roderick McIntosh
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Qualified students may pursue special reading or research under the guidance of an instructor. A written statement of the proposed research must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies for approval.
 
ARCG  473a , Civilizations and Collapse .
Th 9.25-11.15 SA10 105 Harvey Weiss
Hu, So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Collapse documented in the archaeological and early historical records of the Old and New Worlds, including Mesopotamia, Mesoamerica, the Andes, and Europe. Analysis of politicoeconomic vulnerabilities, resiliencies, and adaptations in face of abrupt climate change; anthropogenic environmental degradation; resource depletion; "barbarian" incursions; and class conflict.
 
ARCG  483a , Archaeology of Sacred Sites .
M 3.30-5.20 WLH 210 John Hale
So  (37)  
Permission of instructor required
A global and interdisciplinary survey of ancient religious sites, from tombs and temples to entire sacred landscapes. Focus on reconstructing the ancient beliefs encoded within the archaeological record.
 
ARCG  491a , Senior Research Project in Archaeology .
1 HTBA William Honeychurch
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Required of all students majoring in Archaeological Studies. Supervised investigation of some archaeological topic in depth. The course requirement is a long essay to be submitted as the student's senior essay. The student should present a prospectus and bibliography to the director of undergraduate studies no later than the third week of the term. Written approval from the faculty member who will direct the reading and writing for the course must accompany the prospectus.
 
ARCG  491b , Senior Research Project in Archaeology .
1 HTBA Roderick McIntosh
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Required of all students majoring in Archaeological Studies. Supervised investigation of some archaeological topic in depth. The course requirement is a long essay to be submitted as the student's senior essay. The student should present a prospectus and bibliography to the director of undergraduate studies no later than the third week of the term. Written approval from the faculty member who will direct the reading and writing for the course must accompany the prospectus.
 
ARCG  708b , Archaeology of Nubia I (c. 10.000-1.500 BCE) .
F 2.30-4.20 HGS 220B Maria Gatto
    
The seminar for graduate students discusses the archaeology of Nubia, from the beginning of the Holocene to the conquest by the Egyptian Empire during the New Kingdom. The history of the region will be approached from a Nubian perspective, mainly focused on the analysis of the archaeological record. Topics include cattle domestication and the origin of the African Neolithic model, social complexity, state formation, ethnicity and boundaries and social markers.