Cognitive Science

For courses in other departments that may count toward the major, see the printed YCPS or consult the director of undergraduate studies.
Information regarding the required and recommended textbooks for courses in Yale College can be found in the Online Course Information system (OCI).

 
CGSC  110a , Introduction to Cognitive Science .
MW 2.30-3.45 YUAG AUD Brian Scholl
So  (0)  

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of how the mind works. Discussion of tools, theories, and assumptions from psychology, computer science, neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy.

 
CGSC  152a , Moralities of Everyday Life .
TTh 4.00-5.15 BATTEL CHAPEL Paul Bloom
So  (0)  
The modern science of moral thought and moral action explored through disciplines such as cognitive science, social and developmental psychology, neuroscience, behavioral economics, and analytic philosophy. Empathy and compassion in babies and young children; emotional reactions to family, friends, and strangers; the origins of prejudice and bigotry; sexuality, disgust, and purity; punishment, revenge, and forgiveness; the relationship between morality and religion.
 
CGSC  201a , Brain and Thought: An Introduction to the Human Brain .
TTh 2.30-3.20 LC 102; 1 HTBA Amy Arnsten
Sc  (27)  
Permission of instructor required

An introduction to human brain anatomy, physiology, and function for Cognitive Science and non¿science majors. Focus on basic concepts of neural function and on brain mechanisms underlying higher cognitive abilities. Includes readings about and videos of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders or brain lesions.

 
CGSC  281b , Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature .
TTh 10.30-11.20 SSS 114; 1 HTBA Tamar Gendler
Hu  (23)  
Central texts from the Western philosophical tradition paired with recent findings in cognitive science and related fields. Possible topics include Plato's discussion of innate ideas and current research on infant development; Aristotle's conception of character and modern research in social psychology; Epictetus's writings on human flourishing and contemporary work on happiness; Nietzsche's genealogy of morals and findings from cognitive science.
 
CGSC  301a ,

Neurological Basis of Prosody and Meaning

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W 9.25-11.15 CC NAPR Maria Piñango
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

The interactions of prosodic structure and meaning structure with syntactic structure, from a neurological perspective. The interface mechanisms among these three structural levels as they can be mapped onto the cortical and subcortical connectivity paths proposed to support sentence-level comprehension.

 
CGSC  343a , Music Cognition .
MW 1.00-2.15 WLH 201 Ian Quinn
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

A survey of historical and current approaches to questions about the perception and cognition of music. Topics include psychoacoustics; the cognitive neuroscience of music; relationships between music and language; the nature of musical knowledge; and debates about aesthetics, evolutionary psychology, and musical universals.

Prerequisite: MUSI 110 or familiarity with music notation.

 
CGSC  390b , Junior Seminar in Cognitive Science .
T 3.30-5.30 WALL81 301 Eric Mandelbaum
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Discussion of historically important papers in cognitive science. Topics are varied and reflect student interests. Some attention to planning for the senior project. Intended for juniors in the Cognitive Science major.

 
CGSC  408b , Cognitive Science of Ignorance .
M 1.30-3.20 SSS 201 Frank Keil
So  (36)  
Permission of instructor required

Examination of how adults and children make sense of the artificial and natural world with incomplete knowledge and understanding. Topics include awareness of the limits of one's knowledge, mistakes in understanding, gullibility and cynicism, deference, the division of cognitive labor, knowledge management, and science literacy.

 
CGSC  430b , Mind Perception .
T 7.00-8.50p K 207 Joshua Knobe
Hu  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
Consideration of how people make the distinction between things that have minds and things that do not. Topics include the attribution of minds to machines and robots, to group agents such as corporations, to God, and to people from other genders or racial groups.
Prerequisites: PHIL 115 and either DRST 003, 004 or PHIL 125, 126.
 
CGSC  431a , Cognitive Architecture: Belief and Modularity .
M 7.00-8.50p C 104 Eric Mandelbaum
Hu  (0)  
Permission of instructor required
An investigation of cognitive architecture: an attempt to create a model of the mind in the broadest sense. Alternative models of the mind, with modular models as the starting point. Selected models of central cognition, focusing in particular on the roles of belief acquisition and belief storage in constraining models of central cognition.
 
CGSC  471a , Directed Research in Cognitive Science .
HTBA Brian Scholl
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Research projects for qualified students. The student must be supervised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty, who sets the requirements and directs the research. To register, a student must submit a written plan of study to the director of undergraduate studies and the faculty supervisor. The normal minimum requirement is a written report of the completed research, but individual faculty members may set alternative equivalent requirements.

May be elected for one or two terms.

 
CGSC  472b , Directed Research in Cognitive Science .
HTBA Brian Scholl
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Research projects for qualified students. The student must be supervised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty, who sets the requirements and directs the research. To register, a student must submit a written plan of study to the director of undergraduate studies and the faculty supervisor. The normal minimum requirement is a written report of the completed research, but individual faculty members may set alternative equivalent requirements.

May be elected for one or two terms.

 
CGSC  473a , Directed Reading in Cognitive Science .
HTBA Brian Scholl
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Individual study for qualified students who wish to investigate an area of cognitive science not covered in regular courses. The student must be supervised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty, who sets the requirements and meets regularly with the student. To register, a student must submit a written plan of study to the director of undergraduate studies and the faculty supervisor. The normal minimum requirement is a term paper, but individual faculty members may set alternative equivalent requirements.

May be elected for one or two terms.

 
CGSC  474b , Directed Reading in Cognitive Science .
HTBA Brian Scholl
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Individual study for qualified students who wish to investigate an area of cognitive science not covered in regular courses. The student must be supervised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty, who sets the requirements and meets regularly with the student. To register, a student must submit a written plan of study to the director of undergraduate studies and the faculty supervisor. The normal minimum requirement is a term paper, but individual faculty members may set alternative equivalent requirements.

May be elected for one or two terms.

 
CGSC  490a ,

Senior Colloquium and Project

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HTBA Joshua Knobe
   (0) Credit/Year Only
Permission of instructor required

A research colloquium leading to the selection of a topic for, and the completion of, the senior essay. Students attend regular colloquium presentations by outside scholars. By the end of the fall term students choose an essay topic. During the spring term presentations become more narrowly focused on students' senior projects.

 
CGSC  491b , Senior Colloquium and Project .
HTBA Joshua Knobe
   (0) Credit/Year Only
Permission of instructor required

A research colloquium leading to the selection of a topic for, and the completion of, the senior essay. Students attend regular colloquium presentations by outside scholars. By the end of the fall term students choose an essay topic. During the spring term presentations become more narrowly focused on students' senior projects.