Cognitive Science

For courses in other departments that may count toward the major, see the printed YCPS or consult the director of undergraduate studies.
Information regarding the required and recommended textbooks for courses in Yale College can be found in the Online Course Information system (OCI).

 
CGSC  110a , Introduction to Cognitive Science .
MW 2.30-3.45 YUAG AUD Brian Scholl
So  (0)  

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of how the mind works. Discussion of tools, theories, and assumptions from psychology, computer science, neuroscience, linguistics, and philosophy.

 
CGSC  201a , Brain and Thought: An Introduction to the Human Brain .
TTh 2.30-3.20 LC 102; 1 HTBA Amy Arnsten
Sc  (27)  
Permission of instructor required
An introduction to human brain anatomy, physiology, and function, designed for neuroscience-related majors but accessible to nonscience majors. Focus on basic concepts of neural function and on brain mechanisms underlying perception, memory, and higher cognitive abilities, and how these are altered in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders.
 
CGSC  216b , Cognitive Science of Language .
MW 2.30-3.45 WLH 201 Robert Frank
So  (37)  

The study of language from the perspective of cognitive science. An exploration of the mental structures that underlie our ability to learn and process language, drawing on studies of normal and atypical language development and processing, brain imaging, neuropsychology, and computational modeling. Innate linguistic structure vs. determination by experience and culture; the relation between linguistic and nonlinguistic cognition in the domains of decision making, social cognition, and musical cognition; the degree that our language shapes perceptions of color, number, space, and gender.

 
CGSC  282b , Perspectives on Human Nature .
TTh 2.30-3.20 LC 102; 1 HTBA Joshua Knobe
Hu  (27)  

Comparison of philosophical and psychological perspectives on human nature. Nietzsche on morality, paired with contemporary work on the psychology of moral judgment; Marx on religion, paired with systematic research on the science of religious belief; Schopenhauer paired with social psychology on happiness.

 
CGSC  304a , The Mental Lives of Babies and Animals .
TTh 11.35-12.50 WLH 119 Karen Wynn
So  (0)  

Interdisciplinary exploration of the cognitive, social, and emotional capacities of creatures lacking language and culture. The extent to which our complex psychology is unique to mature humans; the relative richness of a mental life without language or culture. Some attention to particular human populations such as children with autism and adults with language disorders.

 
CGSC  358b , Cognition of Musical Rhythm .
TTh 2.30-3.45 STOECK 210 Ève Poudrier
Hu  (27)  
Permission of instructor required

An introduction to the study of musical rhythm from the dual perspective of music theory and psychology. The nature of musical temporality explored through study of works from a variety of musical styles and through a survey of relevant experimental work on rhythm perception and production. Topics include cognitive limits on the perception of temporal structures; categorical perception and the role of memory; attention, entrainment, and sensorimotor synchronization; expressive timing; and complex rhythmic structures.

 
CGSC  390a , Junior Seminar in Cognitive Science .
T 3.30-5.30 BASSLB L73 Steve Guglielmo
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Discussion of historically important papers in cognitive science. Topics are varied and reflect student interests. Some attention to planning for the senior project. Intended for juniors in the Cognitive Science major.

 
CGSC  390b , Junior Seminar in Cognitive Science .
  Steve Guglielmo
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Discussion of historically important papers in cognitive science. Topics are varied and reflect student interests. Some attention to planning for the senior project. Intended for juniors in the Cognitive Science major.

 
CGSC  391b , Current Topics in Cognitive Science .
T 3.30-5.20 SSS 201 Steve Guglielmo
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Recent empirical and theoretical discoveries in cognitive science across a variety of disciplines. Perspectives from social, developmental, and evolutionary psychology, cognitive neuroscience, philosophy, law, and other fields.

Priority to majors in Cognitive Science and in Psychology.

 
CGSC  407b , Cognitive Science of Causality .
M 1.30-3.20 K 207 Frank Keil
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Examination of how people and animals track causal patterns in the world around them. Topics include the perception of causality; mechanistic, teleological, and psychological causation; variations in causal thinking across domains; the role of counterfactuals; biases and heuristics in causal thought; and the development of causal thinking.

 
CGSC  413b , Mind, Brain, and Society .
T 1.30-3.20 SSS 201 Marvin Chun
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Recent advances in modern neuroscience as they inform or complicate issues in society. Views from disciplines such as psychology, philosophy, economics, political science, law, and religion.

 
CGSC  425b , Social Perception .
Th 1.30-3.20 SSS 201 Brian Scholl
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Connections between visual perception, among the earliest and most basic of our cognitive processes, and social cognition, among the most advanced forms of higher-level cognition. The perception of animacy, agency, and goal-directedness; biological motion; face perception (including the perception of facial attractiveness); gaze processing and social attention; "thin-slicing" and "perceptual stereotypes"; and social and cultural influences on perception.

 
CGSC  429a , Philosophical Implications of Social Psychology .
M 7.00-8.50p LC 104 Tamar Gendler
Hu  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

The philosophical implications of recent work in social psychology showing the important role that social structures play in influencing human behavior. Topics include authority and obedience, and implicit racial attitudes.

Prerequisites: two courses in philosophy and one in psychology, or equivalents.

 
CGSC  451a , Violence and Human Dignity .
T 1.30-3.20 RKZ 05 Stephen Darwall
Hu  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Examination of the deep connections between concepts of violence and the distinctive kind of value we suppose human beings to have: a dignity that grounds basic human rights. Perspectives from philosophy, history, psychology, and sociology.

 
CGSC  462a , Blame and Punishment .
Th 3.30-5.20 RKZ 02 Steve Guglielmo
So  (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Examination of the origin and functions of blame and punishment. Perspectives from social, developmental, and evolutionary psychology, from cognitive science, and from philosophy and law.

 
CGSC  471a , Directed Research in Cognitive Science .
HTBA Brian Scholl
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Research projects for qualified students. The student must be supervised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty, who sets the requirements and directs the research. To register, a student must submit a written plan of study to the director of undergraduate studies and the faculty supervisor. The normal minimum requirement is a written report of the completed research, but individual faculty members may set alternative equivalent requirements.

May be elected for one or two terms.

 
CGSC  472b , Directed Research in Cognitive Science .
HTBA Joshua Knobe
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Research projects for qualified students. The student must be supervised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty, who sets the requirements and directs the research. To register, a student must submit a written plan of study to the director of undergraduate studies and the faculty supervisor. The normal minimum requirement is a written report of the completed research, but individual faculty members may set alternative equivalent requirements.

May be elected for one or two terms.

 
CGSC  473a , Directed Reading in Cognitive Science .
HTBA Brian Scholl
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Individual study for qualified students who wish to investigate an area of cognitive science not covered in regular courses. The student must be supervised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty, who sets the requirements and meets regularly with the student. To register, a student must submit a written plan of study to the director of undergraduate studies and the faculty supervisor. The normal minimum requirement is a term paper, but individual faculty members may set alternative equivalent requirements.

May be elected for one or two terms.

 
CGSC  474b , Directed Reading in Cognitive Science .
HTBA Brian Scholl
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

Individual study for qualified students who wish to investigate an area of cognitive science not covered in regular courses. The student must be supervised by a member of the Cognitive Science faculty, who sets the requirements and meets regularly with the student. To register, a student must submit a written plan of study to the director of undergraduate studies and the faculty supervisor. The normal minimum requirement is a term paper, but individual faculty members may set alternative equivalent requirements.

May be elected for one or two terms.

 
CGSC  490a , Senior Colloquium and Project .
W 4.00-5.50 WLH 001 Robert Frank
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

A research colloquium leading to the selection of a topic for, and the completion of, the senior essay. Students attend regular colloquium presentations by outside scholars. By the end of the fall term students choose an essay topic. During the spring term presentations become more narrowly focused on students' senior projects.

 
CGSC  491b , Senior Colloquium and Project .
W 4.00-5.50 K 101B Joshua Knobe
   (0)  
Permission of instructor required

A research colloquium leading to the selection of a topic for, and the completion of, the senior essay. Students attend regular colloquium presentations by outside scholars. By the end of the fall term students choose an essay topic. During the spring term presentations become more narrowly focused on students' senior projects.